Parenting

In the debate of nature vs. nurture, it is found that each can have an equal impact on development, meaning the way a child is raised by his or her parents is of great importance. There are different types of parenting styles known as authoritative, authoritarian, permissive, and neglectful. Diana Baumrind developed these theories based on a scale of demandingness and responsiveness. Authoritative parenting style involves a high level of demand as well as a high level of responsiveness. It is the most common parenting style and often results in mutual respect between the parent and child, ability to reason verbally, and the ability to self-discipline. The authoritarian parenting style involves a low level of responsiveness and a high level of demand. The factors that make up this parenting style can include corporal punishment, a lack of verbal reasoning, focuses on the parent as opposed to the child, and the importance of rules and obedience. The permissive parenting style involves a high level of responsiveness and a low level of demand. A parent who uses this parenting style often lacks control over their child and acts more like a friend to their child as opposed to a parent. The neglectful parenting style involves low responsiveness and low demand. A parent who practices this parenting style is uninvolved in his or her child’s life and likely does not care much about them. This parenting style can be especially harmful because the child lacks the guidance of strong, responsible adult figures in his or her life and therefore does not have a good role model to observe and aspire to be like.

This graphic gives more insight into the four parenting styles and the connotations they each have.

This graphic gives more insight into the four parenting styles and the connotations they each have.

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